Go Green, Plant a Tree

Trees Create Green Living  

A thoughtful way to live a greener life is to make your landscape eco-friendly and  plant trees.  Planting a tree is one of the most immediate green steps you can take as trees absorb CO2 and other dangerous gasses while replenishing the atmosphere with oxygen.

Canopy trees, and Deciduous trees that  grow tall and full in the summer, will add shade to your home and help it stay cool in the summer months.  They will also allow your home to absorb warm sun light in winter.   In  addition to being good for the environment, adding  these trees to your landscape is an  energy saving step that will lower the cost of cooling and heating your home.   

Another group of trees to think about planting are Fruit bearing trees which will also absorb dangerous gasses while replenishing oxygen.  A big plus in adding some fruit trees to your garden space?  Your garden will become much more  productive.   While  enjoying your favorite fruits and saving a little money at the grocery store, you can also  donate any extra fruit you grow to those in need. Not only will you help others in your immediate community, but you’ll show by example how Green Living can give back, both locally and globally.

Trees and Shrubs as Privacy Screens

 AOL’s DIY Life Network is GardenWise

I worked Francesca Clarke at AOL’s  DIY Life Network on a feature story about creating green structures with trees and shrubs for privacy in your garden and outdoor spaces.  There are many options available for all budgets and timelines, depending on how soon do you need a privacy screen from a neighboring home or structure and how quickly you want to block  unwanted  views.  Pictured is a GardenWise garden in DC which includes Black Bamboo which serves as a screen.  

You can read the story in its entirety here – http://www.diylife.com/2011/04/25/privacy-fence/

I recommend to my clients if they have the space is to off-set the shrubs you use for a privacy screen and consider using different heights for a more natural affect.  Also, if a plant dies with staggered plant scheme along with the varying heights, the gap created by the dead plant is not so obvious.  The back row should have the tallest plants that will create the screen.  The middle row should have medium height plants, such as a smaller deciduous shrub such as an Annabelle Hydrangea, which will offer texture contrast and offer summer color.  The front row should be composed of your shortest plants and evergreen ground cover, such as variegated Liriope, which is grass like and has the added bonus feature of a late summer spiky lavender colored flower. Another striking affect I like is to use the purple coneflower and the Russian sage against the pendulous white blossoms of the hydrangea will be smashing.  Unity in an outside space is the best way to quickly provide a stimulating visual. 

Shade and Fruit Trees are GardenWise

Environment and Energy Saving Tips — Plant Trees    

A thoughtful way to live a greener life is to make your landscape eco-friendly and  plant trees.  The addition of a tree in your land- scape is an immediate  green step you can take as trees absorb CO2 and other dangerous gasses while they replenish the atmosphere with oxygen.

Canopy trees, and Deciduous trees that  grow tall and full in the summer, will add shade to your home and help it stay cool in the summer months.  They will also allow your home to absorb warm sun light in winter.   In  addition to being good for the environment, adding  these trees to your landscape is an  energy saving step that will lower the cost of cooling and heating your home.   

Fruit bearing trees will also absorb dangerous gasses while replenishing oxygen,  and a plus is your garden becomes more  productive.   While  enjoying your favorite fruits and saving a little money at the grocery store, you can also  donate any extra fruit to those in need. Not only will you help others in your immediate community, but you’ll show by example how  Green Living and the simple act of planting some trees can give back, both locally and globally.

The Importance of Choosing the Right Trees

I’m a big fan of saving old and chereished trees at all costs. I’m also big on incorporating older trees into a landscape design. Attached is a link to an “ASK MARTHA” column by Martha Stewart in which she writes about her love affair with trees — Something I can really relate to. She discusses picking trees that are appealing to her, as well as those necessary for foliage color and practical functions, such as thos taht break the wind and serve as privacy screening. Below is the story in its entirety – please always remember that trees, especially mature trees, make the best garden focal points and should be saved at all costs.

Ask Martha Column
http://www2.timesdispatch.com/lifestyles/2011/mar/26/tdhome02-choose-trees-that-work-best-with-your-lan-ar-928826/<a href="

Don’t Cry For Me Weeping Redbud

The Weeping Redbud

The Weeping Redbud is a gorgeous and fascinating tree — it’s a favorite.  They are hardy in zones 5-8 and actually require a little cold weather to encourage budding. They can handle partial shade but prefer sun — and be sure to plant the tree in well drained soil.  A Weeping Redbud tree does not grow very well in hot temperatures – if possible, plant it under the shade of other trees and use organic fertilizer for the best results.

A small tree, it produces beautiful magenta-pink flowers in spring that will make any passerby stop and take a closer look as the trunk will twist and weep into an umbrella shape that will be different on each tree, no two are the same! Weeping Redbud does not like to be transplanted and they thrive with sun. Give yourself the gift of a Weping Redbud, you’ll thank yourself for many years to come.

Get Your “Green” On

Green Living  in 2012

A thoughtful way to live a greener life in the new year is to make your landscape eco-friendly and  plant trees.  Planting a tree is one of the most immediate green steps you can take as trees absorb CO2 and other dangerous gasses while replenishing the atmosphere with oxygen.

Canopy trees, and Deciduous trees that  grow tall and full in the summer, will add shade to your home and help it stay cool in the summer months.  They will also allow your home to absorb warm sun light in winter.   In  addition to being good for the environment, adding  these trees to your landscape is an  energy saving step that will lower the cost of cooling and heating your home.

Fruit bearing trees will also absorb dangerous gasses while replenishing oxygen,  and a plus is your garden becomes more  productive.   While  enjoying your favorite fruits and saving a little money at the grocery store, you can also  donate any extra fruit to those in need. Not only will you help others in your immediate community, but you’ll show by example how Green Living can give back, both locally and globally.

When Water, Water Isn’t Everywhere

Watering in the Heat

It’s important to keep your trees and shrubs properly watered in extreme heat, especially if rain storms aren’t rolling through your area. Heat waves cause damage, so take the time now to give your trees and shrubs a healthy life for years to come.

Birch trees and other trees native to cool areas will be the first to experience drought stress, so water them generously. And keep in mind, many drought-related tree problems may not show up until fall, and evergreen trees and shrubs won’t wilt to show they need water — so pay attention to all trees and shrubs in your landscape!

Newly planted trees and shrubs need a couple of good soakings each week. It’s also important to water the area under your tree’s canopy. If you have an irrigation system, adjust a few heads to soak this area — you can also place a soaker hose through the lower branches of your tree. Keep in mind that trees and shrubs planted in the last few years will also require extra water, as will established trees.

The quickest way to go? Get a glass of water for yourself, grab a hose for 20 minutes, and generously water your trees and shrubs a few times a week.

An Often Watered GardenWise, Inc. Garden in DC