Building A Greener Driveway


Rain Barrels are GardenWise

Today’s Green Living tip falls into the Water Conservation category… recycle water by adding a rain barrel!  Adding a rain barrel to your landscape is a pretty simple project that can be completed in a single day.  Did you know a typical 1/2″ rain storm will fill a 50 gallon rain barrel, while a 1″ rainstorm produces 1/2 gallon of water per square foot of roof area?  That’s a lot of water to recycle,  and lot less water you’ll be paying for from you local water authority.     

Rain Barrels come in all shapes, sizes and colors, and the uses are limitless — you can attach a standard garden hose to your barrel, or you can attach a soaker hose.  You can also use your rainwater in your watering cans for your containers and pots.   Because we love added bonuses here at GardenWise — here’s a good one:  rain barrels reduce the amount of water around the foundations of your home. 

A company I just started to work with, Gutter Supply,  has a lot of options to choose from that will allow you to imagine how nicely you can incorporate a rain barrel into your landscape design. 

 

Some Grass is GardenWise!

Zoysia Grass Makes a Comeback

Turf magazine has a feature story on a grass that holds very fond childhood memories for me  —  Zoysia Grass.  I was  thrilled  to  talk  to writer Murray Anderson about my thoughts and experiences:  

“Zoysia is a warm-season grass native to China, Japan and Southeast Asia. It’s highly adaptable and can be grown in all types of soils from clay to sand, as well as in either acidic  or  alkaline  soils. It requires little moisture and stays green during even the hottest  days  of  summer. (GardenWise’s) Mark  White,  a  Washington,  D.C.-based  landscape architect  and  member  of  the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), describes zoysia as a “wonderful grass – beautiful, thick and lush.” He grew up sliding  on  zoysia-covered  hills in his parents’  yard  and  remembers  it  being dense  and lush,  an  ideal  lawn  to  play  on.

Read the story in its entirety here.

PS – The home featured in the magazine is my house in the Cherrydale neighborhood of  Northern Virginia!

“Green” Garden Sheds are GardenWise

Garden Shed Inspiration for Better Homes & Gardens

I want to build a new garden shed in my backyard this summer.  This is an idea I had last summer and it never happened, so I’m moving it to the top of the “to do” list for this year.  Most homeowners will agree, there’s no such thing as enough storage space.  There’s  a limit, after all, to the things you can stash in your basement and garage.  What I really need is a garden shed – one large enough to house a pretty big arsenal of outdoor power tools while providing organized space for everything from rakes and shovels to mulch and fertalizer.  All of my outside spaces are landscaped, so it will have to be in a somewhat visible area to the left of my water feature, above, one of the main focal points in my garden. 

I had an earlier thought of creating a shed with a “green” roof, and when  I came across this wonderful green garden shed on BHG.com , right, photo credit to Better Homes & Gardens, it pretty much made me realize I was thinking in the right direction.  Thanks, BHG, for giving me the  inspiration  when I needed it most!  

 

 

 

Before and After in Georgetown

A Smaller Urban Garden Challenge in D.C.

When transforming a small empty area into a usable space, select a theme or style as you would for any garden, but think small scale in its development.  When buying plants, shrubs and trees, look for the words “dwarf”, “compact” and  “miniture”  attached to your favorites.  Less  is  more,  and  a  theme provides a single focus which allows you to enjoy the landscape as a whole instead of being distracted by out–of–place  details.  Click here  to  see a  before  and  after  of  a  “zen”  garden  I  designed  and  installed  which  introduces peace, tranquility and intimacy  to a previously unused, small and barren space. The water feature we installed surrounded by river rock serves as a  great  focal  point which introduces you to the space before leading you in a counter clockwise direction through the garden and the intimate seating and entertaining areas.    

GardenWise on Making a Garden “Green”

GardenWise on Productive and Green Gardens

Many clients come to me with questions about how to take  significant “green” steps to make their gardens more eco-friendly.  The question I hear the most?  “Where to start?”  Here are five easy steps every person can take in their home garden that will help the environment and save you money in the long run on watering and energy costs.    

Reduce your lawn by half — yes, by half!  Replace your reduced lawn area with groundcovers that will provide beautiful colors and textures to your space, and add beautiful hardscape or some pourous paving which allow for surrounding plantings to soak up any excess water 

Replace plants with drought-tolerant alternatives that require much less water. 

Also replace exotic plants with native plants that can easily survive and thrive in the year round weather conditions in your area.  This will also cut down on the cost of replacing plants that don’t survive well in your weather. 

Add a deciduous tree (one that loses its leaves in Fall)  which will grow tall, and shade your home and roof during summer months, keeping your inside temps lower.  These trees will also allow for sunlight to enter your home during  winter months to help keept it warm and reduce your overall energy use.  

Make your garden productive by adding vegetables and 2-3 fruit trees.  Vegetables can be grown in former lawn areas, and trees are fantastic garden additions as they absorb CO2 and other dangerous gasses while  replenishing the atmosphere with oxygen.  You can save money at the grocery store, enjoy fresh produce, or help others by donating your home grown vegetables and fruit to those in need

 

GardenWise Before and After – Small Spaces

A Garden Challenge

When transforming a small empty area into a usable space, select a theme or style as you would for any garden, but think small scale in its development.  When buying plants, shrubs and trees, look for the words “dwarf” and  “compact” and “miniture” attached to your favorites.  Less is more, and a theme provides a single focus, which in turn allows you to enjoy the landscape as a whole instead of being distracted by out-of-place details.  I created this “zen” garden which introduced peace, tranquility and intimacy  to the space.