February Gardening

This February is much different than past Februarys.  It’s not as cold, and it’s not as snowy, icy, or rainy.  However, we still have winter garden chores!

Start by checking your perennial plants.  You can protect your strawberries and many perennial flowers as well as garlic, over-wintered spinach, and other crops that can easily be damaged by alternate warming and freezing of the soil with mulch.  Although it is too late to undo any damage that’s done, mulching now can prevent additional damage caused by spring fluctuations in soil temperatures.

You can also take a walk around the garden to check for winter damage to shrubs, evergreens, and trees. Look for damage by rabbits and rodents, too. We have a lot of rabbits in our area this year, so be sure to understand who is causing garden damage before coming up with a solution.

February is also a great time to think about the birds. In addition to keeping the feeders full, you can attract them to your yard and garden next spring by adding a birdhouse now.

 

Garden Layers Add Depth and Distance

Garden Layers are GardenWise!

Add beauty and curb appeal to your front yard with a sidewalk garden. The most  productive  gardens in smaller spaces use  layering, combining layers of plants  that  grow  at  different heights. This bottom  garden is  a great example;  each plant and flower plays its part, and the sum of the whole creates  an  optical illusion  that  gives  your entire property  so much  more depth while adding a significant amount of space between your home and the street.  

The white alyssum and purple-leafed lobelia in the front set the stage  for taller  tulips and butterfly flowers, which are in turn backed by society garlic and a wall topped by glowing pink bougainvillea.

And even if you don’t live in a warm-climate area, you can still take advantage of tropicals such as bougainvillea. Just treat them as annuals, or grow them in containers and bring them indoors for the winter.

Gardenwise on Lovely Lavender

Caring for Lavender

Avoid the urge to cut back your lavender  plants this  winter in spite of their visual decline with the cold — wait for new growth to emerge in Spring before trimming and tidying up your lavender.   It does not react well to hard pruning and may even rot if given a thick layer of organic mulch in winter.  So be patient through this season, and the payoff will be beautiful and healthy Spring lavender! 

GardenWise on Recycling Bricks in Green Garden Designs

Beautiful Green Hardscape Designs    

Using recycled materials in your hardscape featrures is a great “green” step to take when installing any stone or brick  design.  We use  recycled materials when the chance to do so is available,  and the possibilities are endless — recycled concrete for paving systems,  glass in stepping stones, recycled bricks, and crushed stone and granite to be used in  patio surfaces.  Each brick used in this  Washington, DC  garden we designed and installed (above left,) was recycled from a previous hardscape feature.       

An added bonus?  You save money! When I incorporate  larger pieces of old concrete or bricks into a  design,  the purchase and delivery of new materials is eliminated.  Also eliminated?  The material removal and disposal costs.   It’s yet another way to take a Green Living step that also helps your budget. 

Gardenwise on Icicle Pansies and Violas

Move over Mums! 

Now you can have garden beauty in late fall and early spring from spectacular ICICLE Pansies and Icicle Violas. Icicle pansies and violas are selected for their ability to overwinter when planted in the fall. Bred for cold climates, this tough new breed is guaranteed to survive the harshest winters, wherever they are sold. Planted in late summer or early fall, you’ll enjoy blooms until the snow flies and again in early spring

 

Larkspur is a Late Spring Garden Beauty

Larkspur – A Late Spring Bloomer 

If you didn’t sow Larkspur seed in October for flowering in late spring 2013, no worries.  You can buy the plants at your local gardening center.  Larkspur (Delphinium consolida,) which symbolizes an open heart, tends to be a bit fussy, and I’ve not had much luck in the DC-area.  But if you have success, Larkspur is a beautiful addition to any garden.   And for those born in July, this is your birth flower! Each color has a different meaning: the color white symbolizes joy;  the purple symbolizes sweetness: and the pink flowers = fickleness.  There is no better personal touch to your garden space than Larkspur if you’r e a July baby.  

I would be remiss if I didn’t  include in this post that all parts of Larkspur are poisonous.  Please be very careful about where you decide to include Larkspur in your landscape. 

 

 

DC Winters Are GardenWise

 Don’t let the January thaw fool you. Winter is far from over even here in the Mid-Atlantic, but winter shouldn’t keep you from thinking about your garden. These warmer days that will soon become cold unpredictable days are great for planning; mulling over plant catalogs and books looking for new and unusual plants to add to your garden or even starting all over with a new Landscape Master Plan for your entire yard. A strong, well thought out design is critical  to building a cohesive space that is a joy to use. Developing a Master Plan with the help of a skilled landscape design professional will make the project implementation easier, more comprehensive and enjoyable in the long run.  

I often think of things like drainage, plant texture, succession of flower color, seasonal interest, hardscaping and water features.

Remember those bulbs you planted last fall?  They may try to push through the surface during these warmer winter months. But don’t fret, as it gets cold again they will just go back into dormancy; awaiting the warmer days of spring. And since we are speaking of bulbs, now is a good time to order summer blooming bulbs. These are the ones that aren’t hardy to plant in the fall like Calla lilies, Canna lillies and Caladium.  They should go in the ground when you can work the soil in Spring. However keep in mind, unfortunately in our zone 7, these bulbs need to be lifted in the fall and replanted every spring. The extra work is worth the effort as these types of bulbs can bring a flush of color after the spring blooming narcissus and tulips are done for the season. 

As the weather warms this spring in late February or March consider freshening up your garden by cutting back last years dead perennials, adding fresh mulch and maybe some early color with hardy pansies.