Good Garden Bone Structure is GardenWise

Bone Structure is Key to a Garden’s Success

Home owners are often taken aback when they realize, after many hours of prep time and intensive labor,  their  lovely  and very expensive collection of plants in the garden are nothing more than too many lovely and expensive plants in a forgettable outdoor space.    

The most memorable and eye-catching  gardens  are  those with strong internal hardscape structure. Too  many  plants not separated and defined by hardscaping,  a word landscaper architects and designers use to describe more permanent fixtures  that  give  a  garden  its shape,  depth, and  framework for the plants, can be uninspiring and over- whelming.    

Great landscapes get their character from lovely  bones:  stone work, benches,  water features,   garden accents, sculptures, terraces, garden lighting, containers/planters,  patios,  arbors/pergolas, custom fences and gates, and the edging around  your plant beds.  All the elements that aren’t plants!

When you add a bench,  a large rock, or a delightful curving  stone path to a large grouping of your beautiful plants or a garden bench, suddenly the garden comes to life with its own story to tell.  Your garden  will capture the attention of your guests,  and if you look closely, you’ll see them  leaning in as they marvel at your gardens, as if they’re listening to your garden tell its story for the very first time.  

  

 



DC Garden Design Firm GardenWise on Caring for Hyacinths

The main maintenance task for hyacinths is called deadheading. Deadheading is simply pinching off old blooms to encourage new growth and transfer energy from making seeds. However, if you bought a self-sowing variety do not deadhead because you will lose the seeds.

The only other concerns for hyacinth bulbs is the occasional animal or rodent. If you notice missing bulbs and see signs of them being dug up, put up a barrier or fence to discourage intruders. If no signs of digging around missing bulbs are apparent then you may have a rodent problem.  In this case you can protect  the bulb by simply digging it up and putting a wire mesh in the hole to surround the bulb.

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Southern Living Ranks Popular Plants By Their Water Needs

How Thirsty Are Your Plants?

Author and gardener Pamela Crawford is profiled by Steve Bender  in the April 2010 issue of Southern Living.  Pamela is an expert on growing beautiful flowers while saving water, money and time.  In the profile, Pamela provides Southern Living readers with a ranking of nine popular plants according to their water needs , Teetotalers (“these stalwarts never take a drink”), Moderate Drinkers (water 3x a week), and Problem Drinkers (water 6x a week). 

Click below to enlarge the picture.

Land Architects for Hyacinth!

Protecting and Pruning Hyacinth is GardenWise

Hyacinth is a beautiful flower born of a tragedy that became a well known Greek myth — Hyacinth was the athletic youth was beloved by both Apollo and Zephyrus, the bringer of spring and summer breezes.   After his accidential death, Apollo kept Hyacinth from Hades and the underworld by making a flower from his blood, the Hyacinth.  

A great story, and a good reason to spend a little extra time keeping your Hyacinth in top shape, which will require a small amount of work.  The main maintenance task is called deadheading. Deadheading is simply pinching off old blooms to encourage new growth and transfer energy from making seeds. However, if you bought a self-sowing variety do not deadhead because you will lose the seeds.

The only other concerns for hyacinth bulbs is the occasional animal or rodent. If you notice missing bulbs and see signs of them being dug up, put up a barrier or fence to discourage intruders. If no signs of digging around missing bulbs are apparent then you may have a rodent problem.  In this case you can protect  the bulb by simply digging it up and putting a wire mesh in the hole to surround the bulb.

Are Your Plants Teetotalers or Problem Drinkers?

How Thirsty are YOUR Plants?

Author and gardener Pamela Crawford is profiled by Steve Bender  in an old issue of Southern Living.  Pamela is an expert on growing beautiful flowers while saving water, money and time.  In the profile, Pamela provides Southern Living readers with a ranking of nine popular plants according to their water needs , Teetotalers (“these stalwarts never take a drink”), Moderate Drinkers (water 3x a week), and Problem Drinkers (water 6x a week). 

Click below to enlarge the picture.

Gardens Gone Wild!

How Thristy Are Your Plants? 

There was a great Southern Living feature that I need to run because it had so much great information on plants and their water  needs.   Pamela  Crawford, an expert on growing beautiful flowers while saving water, money and time, ranks nine popular plants according to their individual water needs.   Teetotalers — those stalwarts never take a drink, Moderate Drinkers  who require water 3x a week, and Problem Drinkers who require watering almost every day.  Which plants do you have, and which will you introduce this year?  Keep in mind, by adding Teetotalers, you can save money on your water bills while updating your garden space. 

Click below to enlarge the picture.