Bye-Bye Winter Blues!

Floral Spring Fragrance…Yes Please!

There’s nothing better than the approach of spring when things start to come alive… except maybe one.  The idea that soon you’ll walk out into your yard, take a deep breath, and realize all your hard work on your landscape has paid off.  It looks and smells wonderful!  When this happens there’s nothing better and I will have a hard time leaving my yard on a sunny spring afternoon.  For those who crave spring, and haven’t thought about their landscape just yet, here are some plants that you can easily plant to make sure you’re rid of the winter blues:

Bearded Iris- Colors: Pink, white, purple or yellow and will bloom mid-to late spring.  Needs full sun, and will be 12 to 36 in. tall.

Common lilac- Colors: Pink, purple or white and will bloom in midspring. They need full sun, and will be 8 to 15ft. tall, 6 to 10ft. wide.

Hyacinth- Colors: Blue, white, pink, peach or purple and will bloom in early spring. They need full sun and will grow to be 6 to 12 in. tall, 3 to 5in. wide.

Silky wisteria- A vine, 4 to 6 in. long, will produce pink or white midspring flowers.  They need full sun, and will grow to be 10 to 25 ft. tall

GardenWise on Lilacs for Spring

GardenWise on New Hybrids of Lilacs

With the snowing falling once again… my thoughts turn to spring and one of my favorite plants I distinctly remember from my childhood; Lilacs  And for many of us, nothing says “Spring” quite like the scent of lilacs. There are new hybrids and species of Lilacs that make me want to write this blog post because these aren’t your Grandparent’s Lilacs!   There are new hybrids that offer not only the trademark sweet smelling blooms, but leaves that stay healthy and mildew free all summer.

This article from Horticulture magazine describes some of the best species and cultivars of Lilacs for use in the garden, including compact selections and lilacs that resist mildew. Two of my favorites, ‘Madame Limione’ and ‘Miss Kim” are featured.  Keep in mind these aren’t common lilacs (Syringa Vulgaris,) and they all have different looks, so keep that in mind when planning your Spring garden.   However, that strong Lilac scent is unmistakeable, and ‘Miss Kim’ delivers a powerful scent that will make you swoon!  

In the article there’s also a box on pruning lilacs, which should be done in late winter. The link to the article below speaks of the many new varieties that are mildew resistant and discusses proper pruning techniques. Lovely photographs of lilacs in full bloom are a bonus.

And don’t  forget, Lilacs aren’t shade loving shrubs — they always bloom better with full or partial sun.

 

Larkspur is a Late Spring Garden Beauty

Larkspur – A Late Spring Bloomer 

If you didn’t sow Larkspur seed in October for flowering in late spring 2013, no worries.  You can buy the plants at your local gardening center.  Larkspur (Delphinium consolida,) which symbolizes an open heart, tends to be a bit fussy, and I’ve not had much luck in the DC-area.  But if you have success, Larkspur is a beautiful addition to any garden.   And for those born in July, this is your birth flower! Each color has a different meaning: the color white symbolizes joy;  the purple symbolizes sweetness: and the pink flowers = fickleness.  There is no better personal touch to your garden space than Larkspur if you’r e a July baby.  

I would be remiss if I didn’t  include in this post that all parts of Larkspur are poisonous.  Please be very careful about where you decide to include Larkspur in your landscape. 

 

 

GardenWise on Larkspur for Spring

A Late Spring Garden Delight

If you didn’t sow Larkspur seed in October for flowering in late spring, no worries.  You’ve missed the distinctive, feathery seedlings that appear by late winter, but you can order the plants online or at your local gardening center.  Larkspur (Delphinium consolida,) which symbolizes an open heart, tends to be temperamental, and I’ve not had much luck in the DC-area.  But if you have success, Larkspur is a beautiful addition to any garden.   And for those born in July, this  is  your  birth  flower.  Each color has a different meaning: the color white symbolizes joy;  the purple symbolizes sweetness: and the pink flowers = fickleness.  There is no better personal touch to your garden space than Larkspur if you’re a July baby.  

It’s important that remember that all parts of Larkspur are poisonous.  Please be careful when including Larkspur in your landscape. 

GardenWise on Larkspur for Spring

A Late Spring Garden Delight

Sow larkspur seed this month for flowering in late spring. The seed should be scattered in sunny borders that have been weeded & cultivated.  Distinctive, feathery seedlings will appear by late winter and might need thinning in March. Avoid beds that are heavily mulched or treated with herbicides.