Grouping Groundcovers Together is GardenWise

We’ve written a lot over the past two years about losing at least HALF of your lawn areas to create a “greener” more eco-friendly garden. Losing some of your lawns areas is a fantastic way to make your garden space less water needy — and it will introduce new options to make your landscape current and interesting.

Replacing lawn areas with ground covers is a great option I recommend everyone to consider. And remember that if you position numerous species of ground covers together in large groupings, it will add much drama to your space, in addition to both color and texture. Think about creeping Jenny for a sunny areas and Creeping mints for shadier spots. And trailing yellow dale and trailing Lantana.

What to really ramp it up? Bring your sense of smell into the mix and add a fragrant ground cover, such as Sweet Woodruff, to your garden space.

If in the end your heart belongs to grass, think about replacing your lawn areas with grasses and grass-like options such as pink mulhy grass, liliope, deschampisi caespitosa (aka tufted hair grass) or mondo grass.

You’ll need to water your grasses and ground covers adequately until they’re established, after that, depending on the type, you’ll find your ground covers require up to 100% less than your former lawn areas.

Don’t Be a Fool; Lose Your Lawn!

Replacing Lawns with Groundcovers is GardenWise 

 A thoughtful understanding that an  outside space can have a positive impact the environment is the best first step to a green garden.  Another important step to take is to reduce your lawn area by at least half.  To the left is a GardenWIse garden using only groundcovers, no grass!

Substitute lawn areas with ground covers that will provide beautiful colors and textures to your spaces. Groundcovers also help retain moisture in the soil and  help prevent erosion.  Creeping thymes and Creeping Jenny (my favorite) are good choices for sunny spots, and for shadier areas,  tiny creeping mints such as Mentha requienii will do well. Black Eyed Susan grown en masse make for an eye-catching and bright display.  Some nice low-water  choices include Trailing Yellow Dalea and Trailing lantana.  Adding stone elements and pourous pavers can help create wonderful garden paths.

Another substitute?  Vegetables. A small area dedicated growing your favorite vegetables that you can inexpensively install yourself will transform the most unproductive area of your landscape.