Building A Greener Driveway


Water, Water Everywhere!

Water Fountains are Gardenwise

When you think about your outside spaces, take it to the next level and add a water feature!  Fountains and water features come in many interesting shapes and sizes and can deliver transforming results.

There’s something about water and the sight and sound of it trickling and tumbling over stones and splashing into a pool.  It’s one of the most enjoyable and relaxing additions to any garden.  When the sunlight sparkles and all the colors from your garden appear in the water’s reflection, you’ll be hooked!  An added bonus?  The birds you’ll attract with a fountain will make for a great natural pest control and improve the fertility of your soil.  And with a good supply of water in your garden, they’ll eat less of your fruits and vegetables.  

Below is a water feature I designed and installed — and here are more fountains gwww

 

A Hinged Trellis is GardenWise

A Foldaway Trellis!

It’s hard to clean  behind latticework, so a great alternative that allows you to get behind this wonderful garden accent  is to make a hinged trellis that swings open!

Start by fastening a strip of 3/4-by-1-inch wood to the wall about one and a half feet from the ground.  Screw hinge plates to the underside of the strip and the bottom of the trellis. Attach another wooden strip to the wall at the level of the trellis’s top crossbar.  Screw metal eyes into the strip’s ends and metal hooks into the ends of the crosspiece so the trellis can be unhooked and pulled away.

It’s a fairly simple garden project to do and can be comleted in just an afternoon!

 

Phlox ‘Miss Lingard’ is GardenWise

Sophisticated Lady

Phlox ‘Miss Lingard’ is a  GardenWise  July  favorite!  With a spectacular clump-forming habit, ‘Miss Lingard’ has spikes of sweetly-scented, refined pure white flowers that are   disease resistant, so you won’t have to deal with that powdery mildew mess you sometimes get with other types of Phlox.  

Phlox comes from the Greek for “plant with showy flowers” and “flame,”  and ‘Miss Lingard’ delivers with a gorgeous eye-catching spray of flowers.  A June-August  bloomer, ‘Miss Lingard’ gets 2-3 feet tall, is beautiful  when planted in groups, and is our pick if you’re looking for a sophisticated garden show stopper. 

National Gardening Exercise Day is Sunday, June 6!

 

Sunday is National Gardening Exercise Day, and many who have a passion for maintaining our gardens know that working with plants is good for us both physically and mentally.  

Gardening is a moderate, and sometimes strenuous form of exercise that incorporates many important elements of exercise regimes, such as stretching,  repetition of movement, and even resistance principles similar to weight training, while expending calories. It’s important to remember to warm up your muscles by stretching a bit before gardening.  We should also use proper techniques for lifting objects, bending, and carrying — don’t forget to bend with your knees!  You don’t want to end up in your bedroom on a beautiful Sunday morning with a pulled back muscle. 

Unlike many exercise options, when keeping up with a growing garden, you can be involved in what you’re doing, stay healthy, AND still take time to smell the roses!   

   

Fun Family Garden Project

We’re always looking out for fun family garden  projects — last season we wrote about a fun Fall project centered on planting bulbs for Spring.  Now you and your whole family can start your herb and vegetable garden indoors!  Yes, starting cool season seeds indoors is a great project for the whole family.  Cool season herbs and vegetables can be started from seeds indoors over the next two weeks for plantig outside in April.  Each member of the family can be in charge of two or three vegetables/herbs each, with an assigned space in the yard.  Seeds you can grow indoors right now include lettuce, celeriac, spinach, arugula, endive, onions and leeks.  A second project for next month can include planting peas, radishes, and carrots, which should be sown directly into the soil in mid-to-late March.

 

 

DC Garden Design Firm GardenWise on Caring for Hyacinths

The main maintenance task for hyacinths is called deadheading. Deadheading is simply pinching off old blooms to encourage new growth and transfer energy from making seeds. However, if you bought a self-sowing variety do not deadhead because you will lose the seeds.

The only other concerns for hyacinth bulbs is the occasional animal or rodent. If you notice missing bulbs and see signs of them being dug up, put up a barrier or fence to discourage intruders. If no signs of digging around missing bulbs are apparent then you may have a rodent problem.  In this case you can protect  the bulb by simply digging it up and putting a wire mesh in the hole to surround the bulb.

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