Larkspur is a Late Spring Garden Beauty

Larkspur – A Late Spring Bloomer 

If you didn’t sow Larkspur seed in October for flowering in late spring 2013, no worries.  You can buy the plants at your local gardening center.  Larkspur (Delphinium consolida,) which symbolizes an open heart, tends to be a bit fussy, and I’ve not had much luck in the DC-area.  But if you have success, Larkspur is a beautiful addition to any garden.   And for those born in July, this is your birth flower! Each color has a different meaning: the color white symbolizes joy;  the purple symbolizes sweetness: and the pink flowers = fickleness.  There is no better personal touch to your garden space than Larkspur if you’r e a July baby.  

I would be remiss if I didn’t  include in this post that all parts of Larkspur are poisonous.  Please be very careful about where you decide to include Larkspur in your landscape. 

 

 

Look Ahead to Fall Day 3

Dwarf Burning Bush is GardenWise

This week, GardenWise is looking forward with our five favorite  Garden Delights, in no particular order, for Fall 2012.  Yesterday we marveled at the Toad Lily, and Monday we fell in love all over again with Pink Muhly Grass.  Today is day  three of our series, and we’re showing off the Dwarf Burning Bush

Don’t call the fire department because that’s not a fireball in your garden!  The Dwarf Burning Bush  (Euonymus alata “Compactus”) is a low-care, beautiful shrub.  With its upright, bushy and vase-shaped habit, it’s a Fall garden’s best friend with its brilliant and intense fiery scarlet Red foilage.  Your guests will do a “double take” when they see your Burning Bush as it really is that visually appealing.  It is such an incredible garden wonder, it can serve as your Fall focal point. 

The Burning Bush ranges from 6-10 feet high, and 6-10 feet wide, and it’s insect, disease, drought, heat, AND deer resistant, and tolerant of shade (but for the most intense fall color, plant it in full sun. )  It’s also versatile enough to use as a hedge screen en masse.  

Look Ahead to Fall Day 1

Pink Muhly Grass

For the next week,   GardenWise is looking forward with our five favorite Garden Delights,     in no particular order, for Fall 2011. 

Today it’s all about one of my favorite Fall show stoppers — Pink Muhly Grass (Muhlenbergia capillaries.)  It reaches about four feet high and three feet wide, with a nicely cascading, fountainous habit of cloud-like foliage.  It also has   billowy and profuse blooms.  Pink Muhly is a North American native, and looks great en masse in a sunny garden border with hot-pink Knock Out Roses, or as a companion to fall blooming Sedum ‘Autumn Joy.’   Pink Muhly Grass is drought tolerant, so planting this beauty is a nice green garden step, and it’s a real “problem solver” for any landscape architect/designer.  

Larkspur Flowers are July Favorites

Larkspur Flowers are Colorful

If you didn’t sow Larkspur seed in October for flowering in late spring, no worries.  You can put it on your end of summer to do list. Larkspur (delphinium consolidate)is not the easiest to grow and maintain as it tends to be a bit fussy. But if you have success, Larkspur flowers will be a beautiful addition to your garden space.

For those born next month in July, this is a your birth flower. Each color has a different meaning: the color white symbolizes joy, purple symbolizes sweetness, and pink = fickleness.  Larkspur flowers are a great personal touch to your garden if you’re a July baby.  

I would be remiss if I didn’t warn you that all parts of Larkspur are poisonous.  So be careful where you decide to include Larkspur in your landscape. 

Go Grass-Free in June Woth Unique Groundcovers

A Fragrant Ground Cover

Sweet Woodruff (Galium odoratum) is a shade garden delight, and the perfect groundcover for adding fragrance to your garden space while reducing lawn areas.  It’s fast growing, insect repellent, low maintainance, quick to establish, and it isn’t prone to invasiveness, though you do need to keep it in check.  Sweet Woodruff has white spring flowers and an attractive foilage that looks nice in winter, with leaves that smell like freshly mown hay when crushed. Best of all? If you lose some grass, you save on water bills, and help prevent erosion in your garden.

GardenWise on Larkspur for Spring

A Late Spring Garden Delight

If you didn’t sow Larkspur seed in October for flowering in late spring, no worries.  You’ve missed the distinctive, feathery seedlings that appear by late winter, but you can order the plants online or at your local gardening center.  Larkspur (Delphinium consolida,) which symbolizes an open heart, tends to be temperamental, and I’ve not had much luck in the DC-area.  But if you have success, Larkspur is a beautiful addition to any garden.   And for those born in July, this  is  your  birth  flower.  Each color has a different meaning: the color white symbolizes joy;  the purple symbolizes sweetness: and the pink flowers = fickleness.  There is no better personal touch to your garden space than Larkspur if you’re a July baby.  

It’s important that remember that all parts of Larkspur are poisonous.  Please be careful when including Larkspur in your landscape. 

Land Architects for Hyacinth!

Protecting and Pruning Hyacinth is GardenWise

Hyacinth is a beautiful flower born of a tragedy that became a well known Greek myth — Hyacinth was the athletic youth was beloved by both Apollo and Zephyrus, the bringer of spring and summer breezes.   After his accidential death, Apollo kept Hyacinth from Hades and the underworld by making a flower from his blood, the Hyacinth.  

A great story, and a good reason to spend a little extra time keeping your Hyacinth in top shape, which will require a small amount of work.  The main maintenance task is called deadheading. Deadheading is simply pinching off old blooms to encourage new growth and transfer energy from making seeds. However, if you bought a self-sowing variety do not deadhead because you will lose the seeds.

The only other concerns for hyacinth bulbs is the occasional animal or rodent. If you notice missing bulbs and see signs of them being dug up, put up a barrier or fence to discourage intruders. If no signs of digging around missing bulbs are apparent then you may have a rodent problem.  In this case you can protect  the bulb by simply digging it up and putting a wire mesh in the hole to surround the bulb.