Plentiful Pansies Please

Attention All Pansy Fans!

These  TRAILING  PANSIES  are a  “must have”  for  anyone  with  even  the  slightest  attraction  to pansies.  They  survive  very  cold  temps, they trail, and they bloom from Fall to Spring.  They also are an ideal choice in a setting where uniformity is important..  And these hybrids are trialing, which makes them perfect for hanging baskets and containers.  

The  colors  will  make  you smile from ear to ear — a great way to celebrate Spring and Summer .

Phlox ‘Miss Lingard’ is GardenWise

Sophisticated Lady

Phlox ‘Miss Lingard’ is a  GardenWise  July  favorite!  With a spectacular clump-forming habit, ‘Miss Lingard’ has spikes of sweetly-scented, refined pure white flowers that are   disease resistant, so you won’t have to deal with that powdery mildew mess you sometimes get with other types of Phlox.  

Phlox comes from the Greek for “plant with showy flowers” and “flame,”  and ‘Miss Lingard’ delivers with a gorgeous eye-catching spray of flowers.  A June-August  bloomer, ‘Miss Lingard’ gets 2-3 feet tall, is beautiful  when planted in groups, and is our pick if you’re looking for a sophisticated garden show stopper. 

A Fragrant Groundcover is GardenWise

GardenWise is Sweet on Woodruff

Sweet Woodruff (Galium odoratum) is a shade garden delight, and the perfect groundcover for adding fragrance to your outside space while reducing lawn areas.  Easily grown in average, medium to wet, well-drained soils, it’s fast growing, insect repellent, low  maintainance,  quick to establish and it isn’t prone to invasiveness — though you definitely  do  need to keep it in check.   Sweet Woodruff  has  white  spring flowers  and  an attractive eye-catching foilage.   The foliage’s scent intensifies when  the  flowers  are dried, which  makes them a popular choice for those making potpourri.

DC Garden Design Firm GardenWise on Caring for Hyacinths

The main maintenance task for hyacinths is called deadheading. Deadheading is simply pinching off old blooms to encourage new growth and transfer energy from making seeds. However, if you bought a self-sowing variety do not deadhead because you will lose the seeds.

The only other concerns for hyacinth bulbs is the occasional animal or rodent. If you notice missing bulbs and see signs of them being dug up, put up a barrier or fence to discourage intruders. If no signs of digging around missing bulbs are apparent then you may have a rodent problem.  In this case you can protect  the bulb by simply digging it up and putting a wire mesh in the hole to surround the bulb.

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Southern Living Ranks Popular Plants By Their Water Needs

How Thirsty Are Your Plants?

Author and gardener Pamela Crawford is profiled by Steve Bender  in the April 2010 issue of Southern Living.  Pamela is an expert on growing beautiful flowers while saving water, money and time.  In the profile, Pamela provides Southern Living readers with a ranking of nine popular plants according to their water needs , Teetotalers (“these stalwarts never take a drink”), Moderate Drinkers (water 3x a week), and Problem Drinkers (water 6x a week). 

Click below to enlarge the picture.

DC’s GardenWise on Shade Garden Favorites

 

One of my all time favorites, and a recent top choice by  GardenWise as a “must-have” Fall 2010 garden favorite, is Toad Lily (Tricyrtis.)   As I earlier wrote, Toad Lily, with its  beautiful orchid-like white flowers, purple flecks and graceful arching growth habit, compels anyone who gazes upon it to stop and take a closer look.  

Better Homes & Gardens lists Toad Lily as one of their best perennials for shade, and I’m thrilled that more attention is pointed in this fantastic perennial’s directon.  Make your shade explode with interest and color by adding the unforgetable beauty of Toad Lily.

Gardenwise on Icicle Pansies and Violas

Move over Mums! 

Now you can have garden beauty in late fall and early spring from spectacular ICICLE Pansies and Icicle Violas. Icicle pansies and violas are selected for their ability to overwinter when planted in the fall. Bred for cold climates, this tough new breed is guaranteed to survive the harshest winters, wherever they are sold. Planted in late summer or early fall, you’ll enjoy blooms until the snow flies and again in early spring